Guide to Identifying and Controlling Postharvest Tomato Diseases in Florida
view on EDIS
PDF-2020

Keywords

Tomato
Postharvest Handling
Quality
Decay
Disease

How to Cite

Bartz, Jerry, Gary Vallad, and Steven Sargent. 2020. “Guide to Identifying and Controlling Postharvest Tomato Diseases in Florida”. EDIS 2020 (5). https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-hs131-2020.

Abstract

Pathogens are present in all tomato production areas and are most numerous when the weather becomes warm and wet. Movement of weather fronts or tropical storms through production areas can also affect the susceptibility of tomato fruit to decay. Fruit decays can be minimized by the employment of strict sanitation measures along with careful handling. This bulletin is designed to supplement field scouting and identification guides by

a) describing postharvest decay pathogens important to Florida tomato packers and shippers,

b) presenting sanitation guidelines for controlling decay pathogens during harvest and handling operations,

c) offering appropriate storage temperature options.

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-hs131-2020
view on EDIS
PDF-2020

References

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