Control of Rapid Postharvest Decays of Tomato Fruit
Fruit picked during a rain shower and then dye added to wet stem scar.
PDF-2014

Keywords

Tomato
HS363

Categories

How to Cite

Bartz, Jerry A., Steven A. Sargent, and D. J. Huber. 2015. “Control of Rapid Postharvest Decays of Tomato Fruit: HS1107/HS363, Rev. 12/2014”. EDIS 2015 (1). Gainesville, FL:5. https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-hs363-2014.

Abstract

What is a rapid postharvest decay? Water-soaked lesions begin within 12 to 18 hours after harvest and continue to develop, producing large amounts of fluids. The decay spreads within cartons of tomatoes, producing wet patches in the bottom and sides of the container, a condition called “wet-boxes.” Affected fruit are out-of-grade either prior to shipment or upon arrival at the receiver. This revised 5-page fact sheet was written by J. A. Bartz, S. A. Sargent, and D. J. Huber, and published by the UF Department of Horticultural Sciences, December 2014. (Photo: S. R. Bartz) 

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-hs363-2014
PDF-2014

References

Handling Florida Tomatoes: Round and Roma Types. SS-VEC-928. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://www.edis.ifas.ufl.edu/vh079.

IPM Guide for Florida Tomato and Pepper Production. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/topic_series_ipm_guide_for_florida_tomato_and_pepper_production.

Identifying and Controlling Postharvest Tomato Diseases in Florida. HS866. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/HS131.

Physiological, Nutritional and Other Disorders of Tomato Fruit. HS-954. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs200.
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