Guidelines for Writing Quality Impact Statements for Workload and Marketing
A man in a suit spraypainting "everyone has a story" on a wall in bold red letters.
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PDF-2016

Keywords

Workload and marketing
WC241

Categories

How to Cite

Harder, Amy, and Ruth Borger. 2016. “Guidelines for Writing Quality Impact Statements for Workload and Marketing: AEC579/WC241, 1/2016”. EDIS 2016 (1). Gainesville, FL:3. https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-wc241-2016.

Abstract

There’s nothing like a great story to catch people’s attention. Extension faculty can use storytelling techniques to develop strong impact statements that communicate the results of their programming. This 3-page fact sheet dissects the different elements of an impact story, explains how to connect a story to the large impact of the program, and provides an example of a success story with impact statement. Written by Amy Harder and Ruth Borger, and published by the Agricultural Education and Communication Department, January 2016.

AEC579/WC241: Guidelines for Writing Quality Impact Statements for Workload and Marketing (ufl.edu)

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-wc241-2016
view on EDIS
PDF-2016

References

Benge, M., & Harder, A. (2008). Creating interest in learners. AEC 393. Gainesvile: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. Available at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/WC074 https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-wc074-2008

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