An Informational Guide to Common Stony Corals of Florida
side image of gopher tortoise opening its mouth. Figure 4 from  Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Gopher Tortoise: WEC396/UW441, 8/2018
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Keywords

Species identification
field guide
corals
Florida Reef Tract

How to Cite

Henry, Joseph, Roy P. Yanong, Maia McGuire, and Joshua T. Patterson. 2018. “An Informational Guide to Common Stony Corals of Florida: FA210/FA210, 10/2018”. EDIS 2018 (5). https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-fa210-2018.

Abstract

The following information is meant to be a guide to Scleractinian (stony) corals of Florida. All corals presented in this paper are in a protected status under Florida’s Coral Reef Protection Act and several of these species are federally protected under the Endangered Species Act. In their natural environment, these corals should never be handled or touched in any form.

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-fa210-2018
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References

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