A New Graduate Level Seminar to Prepare Students for the Next Step in Their Careers

  • Kelly L. Fleming University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195
  • James Matthaei University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195
  • Jim Pfaendtner University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195

Abstract

Many new PhDs are not prepared for a competitive interview process in seeking a first job. The

University of Washington (UW) designed the Distinguished Young Scholars Seminar (DYSS) to rectify this problem with three goals: simulate a visit associated with many interviews and a one hour seminar; make UW graduate students aware of where they fit into the job-seekers landscape, and expose UW graduate students to peer evaluation decision making processes that governs funding decisions. 

Author Biographies

Kelly L. Fleming, University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195

Kelly Fleming holds a B.S. (Colorado School of Mines, 2010) in chemical and biochemical engineering, an M.S. (University of Washington, 2013) and is currently a Ph.D. student (University of Washington) in chemical engineering. Her research interests include reaction engineering, biocatalysis, soft matter simulation, and pedagogical scholarship. She is also interested in science communication and science policy to a non-science audience through her involvement with the graduate student senate science policy steering committee, science blog, and science outreach work with university groups.

James Matthaei, University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195

James Matthaei holds a B.A. in Mathematics and Rhetoric & Film Studies (Whitman College, 2006) and an M.S. in Chemical Engineering (University of Washington, 2009).  He is currently a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Washington and is expecting to graduate in the fall of 2014.  James was awarded an NIH T32 Training Program in Nanotechnology and Physical Sciences in Cancer Research Fellowship in 2013. His research focuses on engineering proteins to self-assemble into 2D crystalline arrays for application in nanotechnology, namely for cancer therapy.  He also enjoys mentoring students from the high school to undergraduate levels.

Jim Pfaendtner, University of Washington, Department of Chemical Engineering, Seattle, WA 98195

Jim Pfaendtner holds a B.S. (Georgie Tech, 2001) and a Ph.D. (Northwestern, 2007) in chemical engineering. From 2007 to 2009 he was an NSF International Research Fellow working in Lugano, Switzerland and since 2009 has been appointed as an assistant professor in the chemical engineering department of the University of Washington.  Jim is a recipient of a 2012 NSF CAREER award and a 2013 Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest teaching designation awarded by the University of Washington. His research interests include soft matter simulation, reaction engineering, and pedagogical scholarship in the area of professional and personal development an engineering context. 

Published
2015-01-30
Section
Manuscripts