What's Happening in Lab? Multi-Dimensional Assessment Tools to Track Student Experience through a Unit Operations Laboratory Sequence

Authors

  • Heather CS Chenette Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
  • Gregory Thomas Neumann Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
  • Daniel D Anastasio Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.18260/2-1-370.660-124612

Abstract

Unit operations laboratory courses culminate many topics from the curriculum and are often the first time students apply their knowledge in hands-on settings. However, many instructors do not directly assess key learning objectives, creating a disparity between desired and actual learning. Using multiple assessment tools, we analyzed student survey and test data throughout a unit operations laboratory sequence to reveal student attitudes and perceptions of their learning experience alongside their actual knowledge and abilities gained.

Author Biographies

Heather CS Chenette, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Heather C.S. Chenette, PhD, is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. She earned her PhD from Clemson University. She has six years of experience teaching unit operations laboratory courses. Her research interests include membrane separations in biopharmaceutical applications and exploring learning experiences of undergraduate engineering students through qualitative and quantitative methods.

Gregory Thomas Neumann, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Gregory T. Neumann, PhD, is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He earned his PhD from the University of Notre Dame. He has taught unit operations laboratory for the past 5 years and his research interests focus on lab assessment improvements and development of heterogeneous catalysts in an education setting.

Daniel D Anastasio, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Daniel D. Anastasio, PhD, is an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology. He earned his PhD from the University of Connecticut. He has eight years of experience teaching chemical engineering unit operations laboratory courses, and his research focuses on membrane separations and using game-based pedagogies to teach process safety decision making.

Published

2021-05-12

Issue

Section

Manuscripts