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Submission Preparation Checklist

As part of the submission process, authors are required to check off their submission's compliance with all of the following items, and submissions may be returned to authors that do not adhere to these guidelines.
  • The submission has not been previously published, nor is it before another journal for consideration (or an explanation has been provided in Comments to the Editor).
  • The submission file is in OpenOffice, Microsoft Word, or RTF document file format.
  • Where available, URLs for the references have been provided.
  • The text is single-spaced; uses a 12-point font; employs italics, rather than underlining (except with URL addresses); and all illustrations, figures, and tables are placed within the text at the appropriate points, rather than at the end.
  • The text adheres to the stylistic and bibliographic requirements outlined in the Author Guidelines.
  • You have submitted all supplemental documentation, including a list of potential peer-reviewers.
  • You have included a tweetable summary of your submission.
  • If applicable (Research Articles and Ethnographic Films), you have included a list of possible reviewers and potential conflicts.

Author Guidelines

Submission to NFJA implies that the content has not been published in elsewhere, except in cases of scientific meetings or symposiums. Please feel free to reach out to nfja@anthro.ufl.edu with any questions regarding submissions.

SUBJECT MATTER

NFJA accepts submissions relating to all sub-fields of Anthropology and tangentially related fields. These include, but are not limited to, History, Biology, Sociology, Geology, Linguistics, Women and Gender Studies, as well as regional disciplines (i.e. African Studies). Research that does not directly fall under the discipline of Anthropology must related to humans in some way. NFJA accepts submissions in the form of Articles, Book Reviews, Conference Reviews and Summaries, NFJA Notes, Perspectives in Anthropology, Dissertation and Thesis Abstracts, Research Posters, and Ethnographic films.

PEER REVIEW 

Research Articles and Ethnographic films submissions undergo the peer review process. Ethnographic films undergo single-blind peer-review. Research Articles will be subjected to double-blind peer review. Book and Conference Reviews, Dissertation Abstracts, Research Posters, NFJA Notes, and Perspectives in Anthropology are not peer-reviewed and all decisions about their inclusion in the journal are made by the editorial board. When necessary, outside council may be sought by experts in the field to assess suitability for publication.

On the submission page, please include the following in the Peer-Reviewers Components document. Please note that the journal’s editors are not obliged to invite any recommended or opposed reviewers to assess your manuscript.

  • Suggested peer-reviewers for your submission (3-4)
  • List any individuals who you prefer notto review the submission
  • List any individuals who would present a conflict of interest

Recommended reviewers should be an expert in their field and must be able to provide an objective assessment of the manuscript. Please be aware of any potential conflicts of interest when recommending reviewers. Examples of conflicts include, but are not limited to, the following guidelines:

  • The reviewer(s) should not have prior knowledge of your submission.
  • The reviewer(s) should not have collaborated (research, grants, publications, or projects) with any of the authors in the last 5 years.
  • The reviewer(s) should not be from the same institution as any of the authors.
  • The reviewer(s) should not have a personal relationship with any of the authors.

FORMATTING

All written submissions should be 12pt font, Times New Roman, single-spaced, with 1-inch margins. American English spelling is preferred. APA 7 citation style is required for both in-text citations and bibliographies. Information about APA 7 can be found here and here. We encourage the use of bias-free language in all submissions.

PROMOTION

If your submission is accepted, NFJA may decide to Tweet or blog about it or otherwise promote your work. Please include a Tweetable Summary of no more than 95 characters that conveys the essential message of your submission, as well as a photograph (if you choose) that relates to your research which we will post through the NFJA Twitter to promote your article. 

ARTICLE GUIDELINES

Articles are managed by the Area Editor that most closely aligns with the subject’s subfield. Articles are subjected to double-blind peer review. Articles should be between 3,000-8,000 words, but exceptions can be made when necessary. The organization of the article should generally include an Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods, Results, Discussion, and Bibliography when applicable. Figures and tables are encouraged if they contribute to aiding the readers understanding of the material. When necessary, supplemental information can be submitted with the article. 

The submission should be submitted as separate files (Text, Figures and Tables, Tweetable Summary, and Supporting Information). Each figures should not be submitted as a separate file, but rather submit all figures into one file that is separate from the text. Figure and table files should be accompanied by their respective captioning. Organization in this manner allows the editor to easily format the document for publication. The Text file should include: 

  • Title 
  • Full name(s) of the author(s) 
  • Institutional affiliations 
  • Abstract 
  • Key words (no more than 5)
  • Main text body 
  • Acknowledgements 
  • References 
  • Figure legends 

Figures should be submitted as editable files, not images. Reviewer recommendations/conflicts should be included as a separate text file. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

NON-ENGLISH SUBMISSIONS

NFJA accepts submissions in languages other than English. Submissions are subject to the same “Article Guidelines” and must be accompanied by an American English translation of the title and abstract. These submissions are subject to the same peer-review process as all other submissions, although the reviewer must be a fluent in academic writing style of the respective language. These are managed by the relevant Area Editor in conjunction with the DEIA Editor. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

UNDERGRADUATE SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES 

Undergraduate submissions are subject to the same "Article Guidelines" and double-blind peer-review processes specified above. Undergraduates are not permitted to submit articles as a single author. They must have a co-author that holds a minimum of a master's degree.  Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

CONFERENCE REVIEW GUIDELINES 

Conference Reviews will vary depending on the submission type. Authors may either review a single presentation, an entire session, or an entire conference summary. All should be between 600-2,000 words, although exceptions can be made.

These submissions are not peer-reviewed and final decisions on inclusion in the journal will be made by the editorial board. When necessary, outside council may be sought by experts in the field to assess suitability for publication. Conference submissions are managed by the Review Editor. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

Single presentations or session reviews should include a concise summary of the discussion clearly stating the aims and findings of the research, as well as an overview of the methodology employed. It should also include a review of the broader impact the research might have. Finally, it should include the authors own opinion on the research presented.  Possible things to consider: Was the presenter/session organized and knowledgeable on the subject? Was the material presented in concise, meaningful manner? Did the research employ novel methodology? How will the research impact the field at large? Was this research appropriate for the conference in which it was presented?

Conference summaries should clearly state the name, date(s), location, keynote speakers, and focus of the conference. It should cover the main highlights of the conference and any interesting or novel developments in the field which arose. Be sure to summarize the overall thematic events which occurred and any impressions you (and other conference attendees) may have felt. Consider: Was the conference successful?  Where might there be room for improvement in the future? Where there any specific trends in overall research trajectories?

BOOK REVIEW GUIDELINES 

NFJA accepts submissions for book reviews as non-peer review content. They should be between 600-2,000 words, but ideally around 750 words. They should include a statement about the significance of the book, and its central themes, but should not simply summarize the book. Consider the impact the piece of work might have on the respective field of research. Does the author(s) have sound methodology? Are there gaps in the knowledge or problematic writing styles? Does this work have the ability to serve not only academic realms but reach out to boarder audiences? These are just suggestions for things to consider, but feel free to expand on any avenue which you feel fits best with your review.

Book reviews are managed by the Review Editor. These are not peer-reviewed submissions, thus their inclusion in the journal is determined by the editorial board. When necessary, outside council may be sought by experts in the field to assess suitability for publication. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

THESIS/DISSERTATION ABSTRACTS 

Thesis or dissertation abstracts submitted for publication must be 350 words or less. They must be from an officially accepted dissertation. These submissions are not peer-reviewed and final decisions on its inclusion in the journal will be made by the editorial board. When necessary, outside council may be sought by experts in the field to assess suitability for publication. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed. Thesis and dissertation abstracts are managed by the Review Editor.

POSTER SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Research posters are a brief visual representation of data that has been organized in an easily digestible format. They should be clear and concise and present anthropologically relevant research. Poster submissions are to be submitted as editable PowerPoint and PDF files. Posters must have been accepted at a scientific conference or symposium to be considered for publication. In cases of cancelled conferences, graduate student author(s) should include a brief statement from their PI or academic advisor/collaborator showing support for the poster’s publication. The statement should read as follows:

I, [PI/collaborator name] support [authors name] decision to publish the poster titled [poster title] in the New Florida Journal of Anthropology. Any questions or concerns about this submission may be directed to [PI/collaborator email address].

Although authors have presented the poster previously at another venue, upon submission they are to submit proof that they retain the copyright to the submission and are legally permitted to publish outside of that venue. It is not the responsibility of NFJA to check that your submission is free of copyright restrictions.

Images for publication must be 300 dpi. Use TIFF or JPG formats. A typical image with the required specifications has a size of about 1.2 megabytes. Images that are not sufficient for publication will be returned to the author with a request to resize or replace. Name digital images “Image 1,” “Image 2.” Please do not include lengthy descriptions in the figure name as this may cause confusion in the layout stage.

Posters have generally already been accepted and presented at a scientific conference or symposium and thus they are not peer-reviewed submissions. The Visual Media Editor is in charge of handing poster submissions. Final decisions on their inclusion in the journal will be made by the editorial board. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

VIDEO SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

Ethnographic films and videos are defined broadly as works created as the result of ethnographic fieldwork or those which use, are informed by, or illustrate the principles of anthropological theory or methods. Submissions are subject to the peer-review process, considering both their technical merits and their contribution to scholarship.

These submissions are single-blind, where the author does not know the identity of the reviewer, but the reviewers are able to identify the author. These submissions are managed by the Visual Media Editor. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

Submissions should be made electronically through the FOJ website, providing information about the film and the research it is based on. Please include a short abstract of the work as well as a biographical note in the 'bio statement' section of the profile form, listing the role(s) of producer, director, photographer, editor, production assistant, academic advisor, writers, and any other persons of note in the production.

Films should be less than 40 minutes in length, but exceptions may be made for films of exceptional quality. The submission must include a link to the film. You may use a trusted file share service or a video-sharing website, such as Vimeo, Dropbox, or YouTube (hosting platform). Please make sure the film is viewable by anyone with link. If the film is password protected please provide the password in your comments.

PERSPECTIVES IN ANTHROPOLOGY 

Perspectives in Anthropology features short-form essays on social or practical issues that directly face underrepresented scholars within the field, or timely issues in anthropology. Original research is not required for submissions as the intention is to provide a platform for those who wish to communicate their experiences and perspectives in relation to the field of anthropology. Topics should focus on both issues and pathways forward to encourage positive actions for meaningful change. BIPOC and LGBTQI+ individuals are encouraged to submit.

Non-English submissions are welcome, both English and non-English versions will be published. Please include a brief summary (< 100 words) of the essay that can be used for promotional purposes (i.e. social media, newsletter).

These submissions are managed by the Perspectives Editor. These submissions are not peer-reviewed and final decisions on its inclusion in the journal will be made by the editorial board. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

NFJA NOTES

NFJA Notes submissions should feature brief discussions of anthropological topics. This submission topic is fairly broad and may include but is not limited to: interesting historical notes, trends or practices in the field, definitions and/or discussion of term usage in the field, intriguing finds, case studies, preliminary findings, et cetera. Submissions must remain under 450 words (titles and references do NOT count toward the total word count) and utilize a maximum of three (3) references. One (1) figure or table may also be used to supplement your short submission but is not required. 

 Your submission should include separate files for a title page, main text body, bibliography, and figure/table (if applicable). The title page should explicitly list the submission title, the full name(s) of the author(s), institutional affiliation(s), acknowledgements, key words (no more than 5), and the total word count. The figure/table should be submitted as an editable file (not an image). 

NFJA Notes are managed by the relevant Area Editor. These submissions are not peer-reviewed and final decisions on its inclusion in the journal will be made by the editorial board. Please see review criteria below for details on how your submission will be assessed.

EDITORIALS

Editorials are written, generally, by the editorial board as a whole or a subset of the board. The theme or topic to be discussed will be determined by the board. This includes articles, news, reviews, interviews, etc. related to the journal's mission. However, authors are encouraged to contact the editorial board if they have an interest in submitting such content.  These are non-peer-reviewed submissions. For editorials that are written by outside authors (not members of the editorial board), these submissions will be managed by the Coordinating Editor in conjunction with the relevant Area Editor to determine their suitability for publication.

REVIEW CRITERIA

All submissions will be assessed for appropriateness to determine their acceptance in NFJA using the following criteria.

  • The submission engages with anthropological method and theory as it relates to the appropriate subfield.
  • The submission presents original research that addresses a question(s) of anthropological interest with new data and/or analyses produced by the author(s).
  • The submission is free of spelling, grammar, punctuation errors.
  • The submission follows all formatting guidelines, including citations.
  • The submission has all relevant components (Introduction, Methods, Results, etc.).
  • The submission is the appropriate length based on the submission type.
  • The main question addressed by the research is relevant and interesting.
  • The topic of the research is original, interesting, and adds to the subject area compared with other published material.
  • The submission is well written and the text is clear and easy to read.
  • The conclusions are consistent with the evidence and arguments presented. They address the main question posed by the author(s).
  • If the author(s) is disagreeing significantly with the current academic consensus, they must make a substantial and credible case.
  • Tables or figures included in the submission aid understanding the author(s) main points.
  • There are no major flaws in the submission (i.e. Drawing a conclusion that is contradicted by the author's own statistical or qualitative evidence. The use of a discredited method. Ignoring a process that is known to have a strong influence on the area under study. Insufficient data. Statistically non-significant variations. Unclear data tables. Contradictory data that either are not self-consistent or disagree with the conclusions. Confirmatory data that adds little, if anything, to current understanding - unless strong arguments for such repetition are made).
  • The title, abstract, and key words are optimized for search purposes (SEO). 

Submission types will be evaluated by the following, in addition to the above criteria.

Ethnographic Films

  • The film engages with ethnographic method and theory.
  • It is the result of fieldwork or is it informed by or illustrates the principles of anthropological theory or methods.
  • Is technically well produced.
  • Contributes to anthropological scholarship at large.
  • If there broader impacts, they are discussed.
  • Includes all relevant components (abstract of the work as well as a biographical note, a list of the role(s) of producer, director, photographer, editor, production assistant, academic advisor, writers, and any other persons of note in the production).
  • The main question addressed by the research is relevant and interesting.
  • If there is text in the film (captions etc.), it should be well written, free of grammatical and spelling errors, clear and easy to read from a visual standpoint. The text should aid the viewer in understanding the research topic.
  • The conclusions are consistent with the evidence and arguments presented.
  • The title and abstract of the film are engaging enough to draw in the intended viewers.
  • The film provides enough cultural and/or historical context for this particular audience to understand the film and its significance both to its original audience and to us in the here and now.
  • The film should have benefit to both the anthropological community at large as well as to the subjects of the film. Consider if there could be potential danger to the subject population by publishing this film.
  • The film’s organization is optimal for presenting the author’s main point. The transitions between frames/subject are adequate but not mechanical or repetitive.
  • The thesis is clear and reasonable, considering the evidence provided. There is enough support to adequately persuade the public of the authors claims about the subject/problem posed.

Conference Reviews

  • The single presentations or session review includes a concise summary of the discussion.
  • It clearly states the aims and findings of the research presented, as well as an overview of the methodology employed.
  • It includes a review of the broader impact the research might have.
  • It addresses if the presenter/session was organized and knowledgeable on the subject.
  • It discusses if the research is appropriate for the conference in which it was presented.

Conference Summaries

  • It includes a concise summary of the entire conference (aims, goals, keynote speakers, etc.).
  • It clearly states the aims and findings of the research, as well as an overview of the methodology employed of interesting talks.
  • It include a review of the broader impact the conference might have.
  • It include the authors own opinion on the research presented.
  • It address if the presenters/sessions/conference was organized and informative to the field at large.

Book Reviews

  • The book fits within the NFJA research scope and asks anthropologically relevant questions.
  • The book engages with anthropological method and theory.
  • The review includes a statement about the significance of the book.
  • The review include a statement about the book’s central themes.
  • The review does not simply summarize the book.
  • The review considers the impact the piece of work might have on the respective field of research.
  • If applicable, does the review discuss possible gaps in the knowledge or problematic writing styles.
  • The review addresses if the book has the ability to serve not only academic realms but reach out to boarder audiences.

Thesis/Dissertation Abstracts

  • The abstract is well written.
  • The abstract provides a good summary of the authors research.
  • The abstract considers the broader impacts of the thesis/dissertation.
  • The dissertation has been officially accepted by the author’s graduate school

Research Posters

  • The poster is submitted in the proper format (as editable PowerPointand PDF files).
  • The images 300 dpi. and are in TIFF or JPG formats.
  • The poster fits within the NFJA research scope and asks anthropologically relevant questions.
  • The main question addressed by the research is it relevant and interesting.
  • The topic is original and adds to the subject area compared with other published material.
  • The text clear and easy to read.
  • The conclusions are consistent with the evidence and arguments presented. They address the main question posed.
  • From a visual standpoint, is the poster aesthetically pleasing. Comparing the text to the background and the images, it is easy to read.
  • The poster has been presented a professional conference.

Perspectives in Anthropology

  • The work focuses on social or practical issues that directly face underrepresented scholars within the field.
  • The work focuses on both issues and pathways forward to encourage positive actions for meaningful change.
  • The author is the appropriate person to write about such subjects.
  • There are no larger underlying issues with the manuscript that need to be addressed.

NFJA Notes

  • The note addresses anthropologically relevant issues.
  • The note engages with anthropological method and theory.
  • NFJA Notes submission topics are fairly broad and may include but are not limited to:interesting historical notes, trends or practices in the field, definitions and/or discussion of term usage in the field, intriguing finds, case studies, preliminary findings, et cetera.

Editorials

  • Editorials are written, generally, by the editorial board as a whole or a subset of the board. The theme or topic to be discussed will be determined by the board. Although not all board members may choose to participate in writing the editorial, they participate in the decision-making process of whether or not to include the editorial in the publication.
  • For editorials that are written by outside authors (not members of the editorial board), these submissions will be managed by the Coordinating Editor in conjunction with the relevant Area Editor to determine their suitability for publication.
  • The following guidelines will be used to assess suitability for publication on all editorial submissions:
    • The editorial addresses anthropologically relevant issues.
    • The editorial fits with the appropriate theme of the issue.
    • The author addresses the possible larger implications of the editorial work.