Coordinating Editor: Megan Hanna Fry

Email: m.hanna@ufl.edu

Megan is a second-year graduate student in the Anthropology department working with Dr. John Krigbaum and Dr. James Davidson in bioarchaology. She received her B.A. from the University of Cincinnati, and her M.A. from the University of Florida. Her research focus is in bioarchaeology, specializing in Anglo-Saxon health and migration. She utilizes isotope, funerary, and osteological data to investigate past populations. Currently, Megan is comparing skeletal data with isotopic evidence to better understand settlement and social relations in the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Lindsey. In addition to her role as editor of the NFJA, she is also the Vice President of Florida Anthropology Student Association (FASA), and coordinates undergraduate advising to facilitate research opportunities for the undergraduate community at the University of Florida. 

Sociocultural Editor: Christopher LeClere

Email: cleclere@ufl.edu

Christopher LeClere is a Ph.D. candidate in cultural anthropology at the University of Florida. Broadly, his dissertation research looks at the sociopolitical and economic factors behind the recent influx of specialty coffeehouses in Northern Ireland. He holds a Master of Philosophy from the University of Manchester’s Granada Centre for Visual Anthropology. That thesis looked at how socially conservative members of the American middle-class use notions of nostalgia at Renaissances festivals as a protest against modernity and social liberalism. Courses he teaches include visual anthropology, digital anthropology, and food and culture. Chris is an avid photographer and filmmaker. He volunteers with several film festivals in his spare time.  

Biological Anthropology Editor: Samantha McCrane 

Email: stickey@ufl.edu

In May 2017 Samantha McCrane graduated from the University of Rhode Island with a Bachelor of Arts in Anthropology, Bachelor of Sciences in Biology, and minors in Arabic and Classical Civilizations. She graduated summa cum laude. Subsequently, she earned a Master of Arts degree at the University of Florida in June 2019 in Biological Anthropology. Currently, she is a Biological Anthropology Ph.D. student at the University of Florida, with a dual focus on forensics and genetics. Samantha’s research involves looking at how often, and under what conditions secondary DNA transfer (the transfer of DNA from an individual to an object via an intermediary individual) occurs, utilizing methodologies that are consistent with those employed at certified crime laboratories. She is also one of the graduate analysts at the C.A. Pound Human Identification Laboratory working on active forensic cases. Additionally, she has interned at the Humboldt County Medical Examiner and Coroner Office in Eureka California, assisted on over 10 forensic archaeology field recoveries, and participated in the 2016 excavations at the Strawbery Banke Museum in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Archaeological Editor: Brittany Mistretta

Email: bmistretta@ufl.edu

Brittany Mistretta is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Florida specializing in archaeology and working towards certificates in Digital Humanities and Museum Studies. Archaeology and neontology museum collections are invaluable to her research, which draws on zooarchaeological analysis, human behavioral ecology, and biodiversity studies to examine how people in the Caribbean interacted with animals and shaped their environments during pre-Contact periods. Her dissertation research investigates how hunting and fishing economies helped strengthen pre-Contact Caribbean communities as part of ritual practices. Her other interests include digital and artistic approaches to develop programs for outreach and community engagement

Faculty Advisor: Ginessa J. Mahar

Email: gjmahar@ufl.edu

Dr. Mahar serves as the Anthropology Librarian for the George A. Smathers Libraries at the University of Florida where she holds affiliate faculty status with the Department of Anthropology. She has long-term research interests in the technology and practices of Southeastern coastal fisher-hunter-gatherer communities of the Late Archaic and Woodland periods. Her current research explores the intersections between cosmology, ritual gatherings, feasting, and fishing technology among Woodland era communities of the North Florida Gulf Coast. Her methods include experimental archaeology, ethnoarchaeology, and allometry as well as traditional archaeological investigation and material analysis. Mahar actively participates in community outreach events to spread awareness of the vulnerability of coastal heritage in Florida by giving public talks and partnering with the Florida Public Archaeology Network.