More than Tweed Jackets and Beards: An Analysis of the Hashtag Campaign #ILookLikeAProfessor

Abstract

The focus of this study was to identify themes that emerged on the publicly-posted #ILookLikeAProfessor hashtag Twitter campaign during August 2015. This qualitative content analysis explored tweets (n=1,855) from www.twitter.com/#ILookLikeAProfessor. Through qualitative open and inductive coding methods, four major themes were derived from the Twitter campaign among participants: 1) discussing diversity, 2) addressing appearance, 3) identifying self, and 4) using visual support. Researchers offer ideas for future study about this campaign and hashtag activism.

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Published
2019-12-20
Section
Original Research