Vol 124 (2011): Proceedings of the Florida State Horticultural Society
Citrus

Evaluation of Environmental Conditions within a Central Florida Citrus Grove: Potential Implications for Pesticide Spray Applications

Chris Oswalt
University of Florida, IFAS, Polk County Cooperative Extension Service, P.O. Box 9005, Drawer HS03, Bartow, FL 33831
Ryan Atwood
KeyPlex, P.O. Box 203, Tangerine, FL 32777
Steve Futch
University of Florida, IFAS, Citrus Research and Education Center, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850
Michael Rogers
University of Florida, IFAS, Citrus Research and Education Center, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850
Published December 1, 2011
Keywords
  • Citrus sinensis,
  • Asian citrus psyllid,
  • low volume sprayers

Abstract

In Florida, the use of low volume sprayers has been adopted as a cost effective way to reduce Asian citrus psyllid populations. Low volume sprayers are calibrated to deliver 2 to 5 gal per acre with a mean pesticide droplet size of 100 microns in diameter. A review of the literature on drift and droplet size identified a number of environmental conditions that could affect the deposition of these small droplets. This study monitored these environmental conditions in a Florida citrus grove from June to Dec. 2010 and provides some insight into the prevalence of the favorable weather conditions for low volume spray applications. On average, wind speeds within a hedgerowed citrus grove were lower than outside the grove. During the study period, wind speeds outside the grove were greater than 10 miles per hour from 1% to 18% of the time depending on the month of the year. Conditions of low humidity (less than 50% relative humidity) occurred during the day and in the cooler months and ranged from 2.6% to 26.5% of the time depending on the month of the year. Temperature inversion conditions existed 16% to 32% of the time depending on the month of the year.