Awareness, Knowledge, and Perceptions of Barotrauma and Barotrauma Mitigation: A Survey of Florida Anglers
Emergent growth of East Indian hygrophila. Figure 1 from publication SS-AGR-411/AG413: East Indian Hygrophila: Hygrophila polysperma (Roxb.) T. Anderson. Credit: Lyn Gettys, UF/IFAS.
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How to Cite

Adams, Charles M., Joy Hazell, Lisa S. Krimsky, Bryan Fluech, Elizabeth A. Staugler, John Stevely, and Robert Bolta. 2020. “Awareness, Knowledge, and Perceptions of Barotrauma and Barotrauma Mitigation: A Survey of Florida Anglers: FE1010, 3/20107”. EDIS 2017 (2):5. https://journals.flvc.org/edis/article/view/127529.

Abstract

Saltwater recreational fishing is an important economic engine for Florida’s coastal communities. The annual economic impact to the Florida economy of saltwater recreational fishing, which sustains 110,000 jobs, is estimated to be $13 billion. Given the popularity and economic importance of reef fish, careful management of these fish stocks is imperative for the sustainability of the reef-fish resource. Barotrauma, a phenomenon that causes problems for deep-water fish caught and brought to the surface, is recognized by fishery managers as a key cause of death in “catch-and-release” reef fish. This 5-page fact sheet written by Charles Adams, Joy Hazell, Lisa Krimsky, Bryan Fluech, Betty Staugler, John Stevely, and Robert Botta and published by Food and Resource Economics Department describes a recent survey of Florida saltwater anglers and sheds light on incentives for and constraints against the use of barotrauma mitigation devices.­http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/fe1010

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References

Kaplowitz, M.D., T.D. Hadlock, and R. Levine. 2015. "A comparison of web and mail survey response rates." Public Opinion Quarterly 80(1):94–101.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 2016. Office of Science and Technology. National Marine Fisheries Service, Economics Program, Recreational Fisheries Economics. https://www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/apex/f?p=160:8.

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