Landscaping on or near Septic Drain Fields
St. Augustinegrass Lawn. Credits: UF/IFAS
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Requires Subscription PDF-2020

How to Cite

Elmore, Whitney, William Lester, James Moll, Andrea Albertin, and Mary Lusk. 2020. “Landscaping on or Near Septic Drain Fields”. EDIS 2020 (5). https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-ss687-2020.

Abstract

Septic systems are common throughout most rural areas, and their care and maintenance are essential to the health of people, wildlife, livestock, agricultural commodities, and water resources. One way to ensure optimal performance of your septic system is to landscape appropriately near the drain field. The purpose of this new 3-page publication of the UF/IFAS Department of Soil and Water Sciences is to provide landscape management guidance for septic system drain fields. Information presented here will be useful for homeowners, landscape management professionals, and Extension agents who work in horticulture, natural resources, agriculture, and family services. Written by Whitney C. Elmore, William Lester, James Moll, Andrea Albertin, and Mary Lusk.
https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss687

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-ss687-2020
Requires Subscription view on EDIS
Requires Subscription PDF-2020

References

Dickert, G. M. 2010. Landscaping Over Septic Drain Fields. HGIC 1726. Greenville, SC: Clemson Cooperative Extension.

Lusk, M., et al. 2017. “A Review of the Fate and Transport of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Pathogens, and Trace Organic Chemicals in Septic Systems.” Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology 47 (7): 455–541. https://doi.org/10.1080/10643389.2017.1327787

Toor, G., M. Lusk, and T. Obreza. 2011. Onsite Sewage Treatment and Disposal Systems: Nitrogen. SL348. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ss550

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