Key Program Outcomes for K-12 School Gardens Identified Through Expert Consensus
side image of gopher tortoise opening its mouth. Figure 4 from  Wildlife of Florida Factsheet: Gopher Tortoise: WEC396/UW441, 8/2018
view on edis
PDF-2018

Keywords

School Gardens

How to Cite

Webb, Susan, John M. Diaz, and Catherine G. Campbell. 2018. “Key Program Outcomes for K-12 School Gardens Identified Through Expert Consensus: AEC649/WC312, 10/2018”. EDIS 2018 (5). https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-wc312-2018.

Abstract

National trends indicate that school gardens are positioned to become fixtures in primary and secondary education.  Garden-based learning and curricula are aligned with school standards and reinforce educational activities in diverse subjects, including science, language arts, math, and social studies.  Extension faculty and staff are often called upon by clientele to provide technical expertise on these efforts within schools.  An estimated 1 in 5 extension agents are involved in school gardens (Benson, 2014).  However, there is a clear lack of an outcome-driven framework for support organizations, including Extension, to use to determine and evaluate the short, medium, and long-term outcomes for program activities. The results from the Delphi study presented in this article represent the first step in developing a comprehensive set of indicators that can be used to create measurable objectives and evaluation tools.

https://doi.org/10.32473/edis-wc312-2018
view on edis
PDF-2018

References

Benson, M. C. (2014). Exploring extension involvement in farm to school program activities. Journal of Extension, 52(4), 4FEA4.

Black, B. J., Haynes, C., Schrock, D., Duerfeldt, K., & Litchfield, R. (2016). Master Gardener-led lessons increase knowledge in gardening and environmental science for Iowa summer camp youth. Journal of Extension, 54(5), 5RIB9.

Dzubak, J., Shaw, A., Strohbehn, C., & Naeve, L. (2016). Food safety education for students and workers in school gardens and university farms. Journal of Extension, 54(1), 1TOT7.

Israel, G. D. (2001). Using logic models for program development. AEC360. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc041

Warner, L. A. (2015). Using the Delphi technique to achieve consensus: A tool for guiding extension programs. AEC521. Gainesville: University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/wc183

The documents contained on this website are copyrighted by the University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS) for the people of the State of Florida. UF/IFAS retains all rights under all conventions, but permits free reproduction by all agents and offices of the Cooperative Extension Service and the people of the State of Florida. Permission is granted to others to use these materials in part or in full for educational purposes, provided that full credit is given to the UF/IFAS, citing the publication, its source, and date of publication.