Learning the Fundamentals of Kinetics and Reaction Engineering With the Catalytic Oxidation of Methane

  • Viktor Cybulskis Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA
  • Andrew Smeltz Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA
  • Yury Zvinevich Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA
  • Rajamani Gounder Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA
  • W. Nicholas Delgass Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA
  • Fabio Ribeiro Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Abstract

Understanding catalytic chemistry, collecting and interpreting kinetic data, and operating chemical reactors are critical skills for chemical engineers. This laboratory experiment provides students with a hands-on supplement to a course in chemical kinetics and reaction engineering. The oxidation of methane with a palladium catalyst supported on alumina (Pd/Al2O3) is used to introduce the ideal batch, plug-flow, and continuous stirredtank reactor types. Students can vary reactant partial pressures, temperature, and catalyst particle size to measure apparent activation energies, apparent reaction orders, effects of diffusion and mass transfer within catalytic pellets, and effects of product inhibition on reaction kinetics.

Author Biographies

Viktor Cybulskis, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Viktor J. Cybulskis, P.E., is a fifth-year Ph.D. candidate in chemical engineering at Purdue University and received his B.S. in chemical engineering from Purdue University. His research interests include studies in heterogeneous catalysis and the development of operando and transient spectroscopic techniques. He is a licensed professional engineer in the state of Indiana.


Andrew Smeltz, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Andrew D. Smeltz is a principal investigator at United Technologies Research Center. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from Purdue University and his B.S. in chemical engineering from Ohio University. His responsibilities include chemical process design and systems engineering, materials science and engineering, and the development of electrical energy storage technologies.


Yury Zvinevich, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Yury Zvinevich is the director of Instrumentation for the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in optics and laser physics from the Institute of Physics in Belarus.


Rajamani Gounder, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Rajamani Gounder is an assistant professor in the School of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, and his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Wisconsin. His research interests include studies in heterogeneous catalysis and the synthesis of zeolites and molecular sieves.


W. Nicholas Delgass, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

W. Nicholas Delgass is the Maxine Spencer Nichols Emeritus Professor of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Stanford University and his B.S. in chemical engineering from the University of Michigan. His research interests include studies in heterogeneous catalysis and the development of steady state and transient spectroscopic techniques.


Fabio Ribeiro, Purdue University • Lafayette, IN 47907-2100 USA

Fabio H. Ribeiro is the R. Norris and Eleanor Shreve Professor of Chemical Engineering at Purdue University. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Stanford University along with an M.S. in chemistry and a B.S. in chemical engineering from the Instituto Militar de Engenharia in Brazil. His research interests include the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic processes and the development of steady state and transient spectroscopic techniques.


Published
2016-08-01
Section
Manuscripts