Class & Home Problems: Carbon Dioxide Capture From Coal-Fired Power Plants Using Calcium Looping

  • Niranjani Deshpande The Ohio State University
  • Nihar Phalak
  • L.-S. Fan
  • Sankaran Sundaresan

Abstract

Calcium looping is based on the simple premise of the reversible reaction between CO2 and CaO. This reaction can be used for separation of CO2 from a mixture of gases; most notably the technology finds applications in CO2 removal from gas streams in fossil fuel-based energy systems. This article gives a brief overview of the calcium looping process and uses the example of a coal-fired power plant for discussing several aspects, including material balances and energy requirements. This article, which is based on an important topic of current research, is written in a format that can be directly adopted for a project in introductory chemical engineering courses.

Author Biographies

Niranjani Deshpande, The Ohio State University

Niranjani Deshpande is a current graduate research associate in L.-S. Fan’s research group in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. Her research interests include energy and environmental reaction engineering and applications in the development of CO2 capture using calcium looping. She received her B.S. degree in 2009 in chemical engineering from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai.


Nihar Phalak

Nihar Phalak is currently a graduate research associate and a Ph.D. candidate in L.-S. Fan’s research group in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. His research interests are in the field of energy and environmental systems, and more specifically in the development of calcium sorbent-based clean coal technologies. He received his B.S. degree in chemical engineering in 2008 from the Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai.


L.-S. Fan

L.-S. Fan is distinguished university professor and C. John Easton Professor in Engineering in the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at The Ohio State University. His research interests include fluidization and multiphase flow, powder technology, and energy and environmental reaction engineering. He was named in 2008 as one of the ‘‘One Hundred Engineers of the Modern Era’’ by the AIChE.


Sankaran Sundaresan

Sankaran Sundaresan is a professor of chemical and biological engineering at Princeton University. His research expertise lies in areas of chemical reaction engineering and multiphase flows. He is a fellow of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) and has also served as the associate editor of the AIChE journal.


Published
2015-05-05
Section
Manuscripts