Towards a Stronger Covalent Bond: Pedagogical Change for Inclusivity and Equity

  • Milo Koretsky Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331
  • Devlin Montfort Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331
  • Susan Bobbitt Nolen University of Washington College of Education Seattle, WA 98195-3600
  • Michelle Bothwell Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331
  • Susannah Davis Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331
  • James Sweeney Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331
Keywords: Inclusion, diversity, consequential learning, studio

Abstract

 

 We describe progress on a comprehensive, programmatic change initiative whose goal is to create an inclusive culture that fosters diversity and a shift towards more meaningful, consequential work. While this initiative has several elements that target different aspects of unit practices and culture, we focus here on pedagogical change. Our design-based implementation research approach involves a continually interacting set of components, including: theory, implementation, and data collection, analysis and interpretation. We show how the threads of identity, academic success and professional formation in the core chemical engineering curriculum can be intentionally interwoven to form a network of practices that fosters student achievement (one atom in the covalent bond) as well as diversity and social justice (another atom).

Author Biographies

Milo Koretsky, Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331

 

 Milo Koretsky is a professor in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees from UC San Diego and his Ph.D. from UC Berkeley, all in chemical engineering. He is interested in integrating technology into effective educational practices and in promoting the use of higher-level cognitive and social skills in engineering problem solving. His research interests particularly focus on what prevents students from being able to integrate and extend the knowledge developed in specific courses in the core curriculum to the more complex, authentic problems and projects they face as professionals.

Devlin Montfort, Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331

 

 Devlin Montfort is an assistant professor in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. He received B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from Washington State University. His research focuses on describing engineering practice and engineering education as interrelated social systems and contrasting those systems, particularly in terms of how they talk about and understand knowledge.

Susan Bobbitt Nolen, University of Washington College of Education Seattle, WA 98195-3600

 

 Susan Bobbitt Nolen is a professor in and chair of Learning Sciences and Human Development in the College of Education at the University of Washington. She received her PhD in Educational Psychology from Purdue University. Her main research interests are in designing environments to support engagement and in how motivation to learn develops over time in social contexts. Current projects include creating inclusive, engaging environments in university engineering programs and studying engagement in rigorous, project-based high school courses and how it might be supported. Dr. Nolen is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

Michelle Bothwell, Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331

Michelle Bothwell is an associate professor in the School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering. She completed engineering degrees at Purdue University (B.S.) and Cornell University (Ph.D.) before joining Oregon State University with teaching and research interests in bioengineering. Michelle has contributed to new program development and improvement to engineering curricula, leading efforts to integrate professional engineering ethics, social and political responsibilities, and social justice topics in innovative and compelling ways. Her more recent research interests have centered on the interrogation of engineering culture using feminist and critical disability theories, and the transformation of academic institutions toward equitable, inclusive and socially just workplaces.

Susannah Davis, Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331

Susannah Davis is a research associate in the School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University. She received her B.A. from Smith College and her M.Ed. and Ph.D. from the University of Washington. Her research focuses on individual and organizational learning and change in higher education with particular attention to the individual, social, cultural, and political factors that shape people’s engagement in organizational change efforts.

James Sweeney, Oregon State University School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering Corvallis, OR 97331

James Sweeney is a professor in and head of the School of Chemical, Biological & Environmental Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU). He received the Sc. B. in Engineering (Biomedical Engineering) from Brown University and the M. S. and Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering from Case Western Reserve University. His research interests in engineering education include engineering design pedagogies and practice, and academic organizational change for sustained impacts. Dr. Sweeney is also the Kuse Endowed Chair in Chemical Engineering at OSU and a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

Published
2018-03-28
Section
Manuscripts